kristaferanka:

and finally, here is the print/key art i made for the Wonder Woman premium format statue by Sideshow Collectables.
you can view details about it here
it’ll be available for preorder on the 13th.

kristaferanka:

and finally, here is the print/key art i made for the Wonder Woman premium format statue by Sideshow Collectables.

you can view details about it here

it’ll be available for preorder on the 13th.




stormwhiskers:

I need to draw more heroes, any suggestions?

stormwhiskers:

I need to draw more heroes, any suggestions?


ungoliantschilde:

Esad Ribic is a master of using lighting and perspective.

-My favorite one is the first image. He only fully rendered a few parts of Thor’s left arm, Mjolnir, his mouth, and his nose. The rest is just suggested by the shading. I look at Esad’s work and I see a lot of echoes from the great illustrators of the Turn of the Century (1900-1901) and the Golden Age of Comics.
This guy is GOOD. I found these convention sketches on:
http://www.comicartfans.com
Yeah. These are sketches. Not fully finished works.
Like a said, he’s good.


signalwatch:

I can’t tell if they’re coming clean about their relationship or leering at you jointly.

signalwatch:

I can’t tell if they’re coming clean about their relationship or leering at you jointly.



bat-sterd:

Women with a PhD in Badassery [15/?] → Cassandra Sandsmark (Wonder Girl / Wonder Woman)

"They’ll rot in Hell for what they’ve done and it still won’t be good enough. Not by a long shot!"


fyeahlilbit3point0:

So in honor of Black History Month, I thought I’d do a few looks at the early black superheroes of American comic books. Nothing too academic but a little outline.  I avoided mentioning Black Lightning, Luke Cage and a few others because I wanna talk about them on a second piece dealing with the Blaxploitation trends of the 70’s.

The first black superhero was the Black Panther, who debuted in Fantastic Four #52 back in 1966. The character’s been in and out of the Avengers over the years and has had several attempts at a solo series, the most successful of which was published back in the late 90’s. He is currently one of the leads in New Avengers.

After him came the Falcon, who debuted in Captain America #117 in 1969. He had a storied run as Captain America’s partner (during which the title was changed to Captain America & The Falcon) and has appeared as a member of the Avengers at various points, and currently features in the most recent volume of that series.

DC’s first black superhero came in the form of Mal Duncan, who was introduced in Teen Titans #26 in 1970. Mal’s had kind of a rough go, running through various costumed identities and code names and spending a sizable portion of his history in comic book limbo.

The following year saw the introduction of John Stewart, the black Green Lantern in Green Lantern/Green Arrow #87. He’s arguably DC’s best known black character, and has appeared as a member of the Justice League of America at various points. He currently stars in Green Lantern Corps. alongside Guy Gardner.

On the heroine front, Marvel Comics introduced Storm in Giant-Size X-Men #1 in 1975. She’s become probably the best known black superhero in general, and has been a mainstay of the X-Men since her inception (even leading the team at one point). She currently stars in Uncanny X-Force and Brian Wood’s all-female X-Men relaunch and also appears in Wolverine and the X-Men.

DC’s first black superheroine came one year later in the form of Bumblebee, who was introduced in Teen Titans #45. Like her boyfriend Mal, she has seen sporadic use over the years, and last appeared in the Doom Patrol shortly before that book was cancelled. She was to appear alongside Stephanie Brown in an all-female teen book that was pitched by Gail Simone, but the title never materialized.

On the mass media front, Black Panther has appeared in guest spots in various cartoons and was most recently featured on the now-cancelled Avengers: Earth’s Mightiest Heroes TV series.

Green Lantern most famously appeared in Justice League and Justice League Unlimited, and became the character most associated with the mantle for a number of children who otherwise don’t read comics. He’s also appeared on Young Justice and Static Shock.

Bumblebee appeared in the Teen Titans animated series as a member of the Titans East, and was a major charcter in the second season of Young Justice. Likewise, Mal Duncan appeared as well, bringing the two characters to a new audience despite their lack of use in the actual comics.

The Falcon has appeared in several Marvel cartoons and will be played in live-action by Anthony Mackie in Captain America: The Winter Soldier. He is also rumored to appear in Avengers 2, where he would presumably be the lone black member of the team.

Storm has of course been seen in every X-Men animated production since the 70’s, and was famously portrayed by Halle Berry in the live-action X-Men movies.  These mass media appearances cemented her as probably the most high profile black character in comics, giving her a level of exposure most other POC superheroes are not often afforded. 


dcwomenkickingass:

That time the DCU Went Dancing
It’s old school costume time as much of the DCU goes out dancing in this piece by J. Lonergan. I don’t think I’ve ever like Aquaman more.

dcwomenkickingass:

That time the DCU Went Dancing

It’s old school costume time as much of the DCU goes out dancing in this piece by J. Lonergan. I don’t think I’ve ever like Aquaman more.